The Future of Bookselling?

Amazon Bookshop

The new Amazon bookshop courtesy of The Bookseller

This is a topic I have purposefully avoided writing about since the completion of my final MA project but with the various tales of more independent booksellers now opening as well as Amazon’s recent foray into opening a physical bookshop I couldn’t resist.

As someone who has dreamed of opening a bookshop for as long as I can remember this is an area of particular interest to me and so I suppose it was quite obvious that my MA final project might turn in this direction and that this is a topic that I follow with near obsession. I wanted to explore some of the possible avenues available for alternative business models in independent bookselling through a method known as the Lean Startup. Through a number of experiments I was able to test my theories directly with the prospective customers and finally tested what I had learned through a pop-up bookshop which included all the ideas that had received the greatest feedback. From this final test I was able to produce a comprehensive business plan, marketing plan and report representing what customers really wanted from their bookshops within my target area.

Pop-Up Bookshop

My final experiment – Pop-Up Bookshop, 2015

The greatest news that I am hearing currently is that of new independent booksellers opening up nationwide who are indeed embracing alternative business models. Now my personal favourite story, courtesy of The Bookseller, reports that a new bookshop is coming to town from the Second Home duo. A two-storey building off Hanbury street, the currently unnamed bookshop will also offer live music, a bar and an in-house printing press.

Rohan Silva told The Bookseller “We think there is a big unmet demand for the type of bookshop we want to produce. If you offer a bookshop with the right experience and space to the young crowd in London, there is a big commercial opportunity. This is a golden moment for bookshops.” The shop will also host a number of events and add a range of alternative experience to it’s customers. When I read about this shop and the plans that the duo have for it I almost whooped for joy. Not necessarily because I believe this is singularly the future for independent bookshops as a whole, but rather, because It is great to see and hear that people are embracing the need to really reconsider the bookselling experience to it’s own customer base, locality and what has the prospect of a future in bookselling.

Second Home

Second home offices, Hanbury Street, London

Again with the news of Amazon’s recent physical bookshop opening in Seattle. Though what they are offering is not everyone’s cup of tea and indeed offers up a lot more questions in the industry, it cannot be denied that they are taking what they have learned and testing it amongst the people who matter. Personally I do not see a chain of Amazon stores dotting our high-streets in the future. To me Amazon excels at what it does online and that is where their power lies, physical retailing is altogether another kettle of fish which it seems hard to believe is quite so easily transferrable to physical retailing. However, it seems logical that Amazon would pursue this avenue, dip their toes in the water if you will, and test their idea on a small scale in order to test it’s viability in our fast-developing market.

What is the future of bookselling? Well this, as Silva said,”is a golden moment for bookshops”. With innovation, bravery and a thorough understanding of what the potential market requires, it seems to me that the future of bookselling has great potential. It is only by taking new innovations to the people that we can truly see what works and what won’t and this will vary from location to location. What does seem clear is that we cannot continue to sell books as has been the way for decade or even generations. My personal view of the future of bookselling (or at least my personal ideal) would see a great deal more booksellers taking on the role of independent publishers as do the likes of Daunt Books, Persephone Books and Shakespeare and Company and in kind to make greater face-to-face sellers of our publishers. Sometimes it takes a glimpse to the past to foresee the future.