Quick question…

I don’t have much to say (actually I have loads though i’m attempting to be good and upset as few people as I can this year as last year was such a disaster for anyone under 50).

It surely can’t only be me who is baffled by the idea that “diversity” seems only to be tackled by the middle-aged, middle-class (or worse, Tory) white (typically males) out there. This seems to particularly be the case in the publishing industry (though I have seen it elsewhere and welcome your observations where you have too).

I am often baffled – in fact so much so that I consider it worthy of a Phd – by the idea of diversity in publishing. Now that it has been acknowledged as a public problem every Tom, Dick and Harry of a publishing company has started an award, started an internship or started blogging about the many changes their company is making to enhance diversity in publishing but why is it that the majority of the people inititating these ideas seem to be white, middle-aged, middle-class, males?

I genuinely beleive that in order to show true “diversity”, or inclusivity as I prefer to see it, it shouldn’t be led by this majority with some ploys to make a few people happy. Sure, they are usually the folk in power who have the final say, but surely it requires going to the under-represented crowds themselves (be it due to race, class, religion or creed) and asking them “what changes do we need to implement to make our industry a more inclusive one?”, “what would it take for you to feel accepted and heard?”.

I come from a rather priveleged background – white, middle-class, educated – but my parents come from working-class backgrounds with no contacts in the industry, people out there still ask me to slow down “because your accent is too hard to follow” (an East-Midlands accent after ten years in London – not a challange for most) and stared at with shock when I say my BA is in the arts rather than Engljsh Literature. 

If I, a priveleged person, still feel under-represented within the industry I so want to be a part of, then I find it hard to beleive that others out there, less priveleged than I in some ways, don’t certainly feel under or unrepresented. How do we fix this lack of representation? Not from the industry as it is, telling us how to fix it i’m sure, but by embracing fully those who represent these under-represented voices. By asking them “What changes do we need to make?”. By asking them to create the change they want to see and supporting it fully as fellow publishers – that’s how I see true inclusivity within the industry finally being achieved.
By realising that inclusivity goes further than just making the right size hole for someone to fit through in that moment, by exploring avenues to make inclusivity the normaliry rather than a novelty, by publishing voices that truly represent our greater society – that, I think, is far more importamt than another award, another open call for manuscripts, targeting a particular community at a particular time.

I call out for those who feel under-represented within their industry to do the research, fight and scream and shout for more than you are given. You are the people I would hire if I were to start a publishing company. You are the voices we need to hear in 2017 and beyond – yours, mine and thousands of others out there currently left screaming into the void.