You can make a book anywhere, so why London?

This is something I’ve been stewing on for a while and now I’m just going to say it…

Publishing needs to break out of London.

Don’t get me wrong, London is great; living in London you have access to almost everything you might desire. A hub for beautiful art, delicious food, thousands of events every single night, museums and architecture, history and a diversity of people I just haven’t personally seen elsewhere in the UK. It is loud and busy and full of life, there is a buzz, a tangible vibe, sometimes it has you grinning from ear to ear and sometimes it makes you wonder if you’re insane and really it is quite often frustrating as hell.

I grew up in rural Lincolnshire in a village with no public transport, eight miles from school and most of my friends. There was little for us to do apart from trips to the pub or the almost 30 mile journey to the nearest city. I’ll be honest, a trip to the supermarket could be considered an exciting day trip.

Lovely Lincoln

Lincoln City

When I was eighteen I headed south to study art and make my way into the creative industries. Everyone knew the south offered jobs and excitement and the freedom to dress and act any way you like. There are afterall no publishers in Lincolnshire that I know of. In comparison the south seemed to offer so much more. It still offers me enough that I’m sitting here watching the world go by, dreaming of my dream job in a London publishing house, only now I wonder if maybe it is time to realign the balance of those invisible borders.

Leeds Library

Leeds Library

It is quite strange for me now to feel so determined that north of the Thames is where the future of publishing may lie. Big businesses in other industries are already starting to make the move to Manchester as the Financial Times reported earlier this year,¬†Government is promising to rebalance the economy by improving transport links in the north, and best of all, there are even places where you can still buy a lovely home for less than ¬£0.5m…in fact a lot less.

London is home to approximately 300 of the country’s publishing houses, Oxford – 30, Edinburgh – 11 and Cambridge – 10, whilst everywhere else teeters down into the single figures. And I have been sitting for months now wondering if we are all missing a trick? Are we about to again be ridiculed for being left behind whilst the other industries move to where the cost of living is lower, the quality of life could be argued as higher and where, for you parents out there, you don’t have to choose six different schools and just hope and pray you get the good one you want. Is it purely out of a sense of tradition that we remain tied to a city that seems to be feeling smaller and more expensive every single day?

In this age of Skype and email, high speed trains and flexible working hours, a time when we are all squeezing ourselves into smaller and smaller spaces within the South East, why as publishers, for the most part, are we not looking further afield?

Sassy Sheffield

Sassy Sheffield

There are approximately 64m people living in the UK, reports say, approximately 8.6m of which are within London, less than half a million reside in Edinburgh and about a fifth of that number live in Oxford. There are approximately 9m people living within the publishing epicentres themselves and the rest of the UK is made up of a further 55m people. I can’t help but feel that with more and more students opting to stay in their university town or city and more still moving back home with their families I would say that now, more than ever, there are vast numbers of hugely creative, well-educated and forward-thinking individuals living outside the bounds of the industries who would so greatly benefit from hiring them.

Cities and towns nationwide are developing, expanding and looking to their future. They are industrialising once again and publishers need to be at the forefront of that happening in order to better reach their readers.

Melodic Manchester

Melodic Manchester

I could probably go on with this for hours, linking research and figures and a lot more opinions but I will finish with pointing out that there are numerous wonderful publishing houses already working outside the traditional publishing epicentres of London, Edinburgh and Oxford and I have the greatest respect for them. They took a model and flipped it around and are doing it well. Some great publishers out there in the wilds include;

  • Myrmidon Books in Newcastle-upon-Tyne
  • Comma Press in Manchester
  • Salt Publishing in Norfolk

(All photos copyright free from Flickr)

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